NJPP Blog: As a Matter of Fact …

New Jersey’s Rainy Day Fund, Nearly Empty, is The Fourth Smallest in the Country

January 27th, 2015 by Sheila Reynertson | No Comments

New Jersey’s Rainy Day Fund, Nearly Empty, is The Fourth Smallest in the Country

Just as households are advised to sock away savings to last them through an emergency, common-sense financial practice says that states should do the same. But the lingering effects of the Great Recession and the lack of a real economic recovery mean that New Jersey isn’t even saving enough to get by for half a week.


Whose Recovery? Nearly All Income Gains in Post-Recession New Jersey Have Gone to the Top 1%

January 26th, 2015 by Jon Whiten | No Comments

Whose Recovery? Nearly All Income Gains in Post-Recession New Jersey Have Gone to the Top 1%

From 2009 to 2012, 81 percent of all income growth in New Jersey went to just 1 percent of the state’s most well-off households, and New Jersey’s top 1 percent took home 27 times more than the bottom 99 percent in 2012.


Pairing Gas Tax Increase with Cuts to Estate or Inheritance Tax an Ill-Advised Gimmick

January 26th, 2015 by Gordon MacInnes | No Comments

Pairing a tax hike that disproportionately hits the poor and middle class with a tax cut that mostly benefits the very wealthy would make the state’s tax system more backward. It would also push a near-bankrupt state even further to the brink by eliminating a large chunk of tax revenue with no proposal on how to replace it.


Video: A NJPP Two-Fer on Wednesday’s NJTV News

January 23rd, 2015 by Jon Whiten | No Comments

NJPP was featured not once but twice on this Wednesday’s NJTV News program.


December Jobs Numbers: There’s No Way to Dress Up New Jersey’s Agonizing Crawl Out of the Great Recession

January 22nd, 2015 by Gordon MacInnes | No Comments

December Jobs Numbers: There's No Way to Dress Up New Jersey's Agonizing Crawl Out of the Great Recession

In the 47 months since January 2011, the recessionary low point of total employment in New Jersey, the state has added an average of 2,628 jobs a month. At the same rate, New Jersey will have to wait until December 2019, yes 2019, just to get back to where we were before the recession.


Any Gas Tax Increase Should Include Tax Credit for Low-Income New Jerseyans

January 21st, 2015 by Jon Whiten | No Comments

Without an EITC restoration, households earning less than $45,000 a year would proportionately pay more towards any substantial new gas tax than everyone else.


Op-Ed: Favored Tax Cuts Would Make New Jersey’s System More Backward

January 18th, 2015 by Jon Whiten | No Comments

The proposed tax changes hinted at in the State of the State would greatly favor those who already pay the lowest share of their income in state and local taxes.


President Obama Calls for More Progress on Earned Sick Days. Will New Jersey Step Up to the Plate?

January 15th, 2015 by Brandon McKoy | No Comments

New Jersey policymakers should heed the president’s call to help the more than 1.2 million Garden State workers, most of whom are low-income, who lack access to earned sick days.


The State of the Stats

January 13th, 2015 by Jon Whiten | No Comments

This afternoon the governor gave his annual State of the State address, touting his success in New Jersey and pointing to his priorities for the coming year. With that in mind, we’d like to present the State of the Stats.


Op-Ed: New Jersey’s Transportation Emergency Demands an End to Political Game-Playing

January 7th, 2015 by Gordon MacInnes | No Comments

Now a new threat emerges. Republican leaders have been making the case that, if New Jersey needs a gas tax increase – which they don’t deny – then the state should make such a hike part of more comprehensive “tax reform,” which sounds like a great idea, but is actually a wolf in sheep’s clothing.






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